Connecting...

Top 10 signs that it’s time to move on

about 5 years ago by Phil Dye
I Stock 15597469 Large

Building a steady, progressing CV is great. Showing commitment and loyalty to a company is also appealing to future employers. But knowing when it’s time to move on is important.

Staying too long in what may have become the wrong job can prove detrimental to you, your career and the company you work for. 

If you’re not sure whether to stick or twist, here are our Top 10 signs that it’s time to compose that resignation letter.

1)    You’ve lost your mojo – if you’ve stopped making an effort and feel that your day has become routine or boring, chances are that you won’t be producing your best work – and it won’t be long before someone other than you notices this.

2)    You dread being in the office – even the best of us struggle with Monday mornings, but if you seriously loathe them and find yourself clock-watching at your desk until 5pm, then you’ve definitely lost interest in your current job.

3)    You don’t feel valued – if you feel like your voice or opinions aren’t heard or that people you consider to be less qualified than you have more responsibility or authority, it’s time to move to a role where you feel appreciated or better rewarded.

4)    You’re not progressing – career advancement is important and many employees would take confirmed prospects, promotions and titles over a pay rise. If you’ve been treading water in the same role and with the same responsibilities for years, another employer may present better opportunities.
 
5)    You don’t like your boss – this doesn’t necessarily have to be a personal thing, but covers any “them and us” mentality you feel the company may have. If you no longer feel passionate about or believe in the company you work for, this may stem from the attitudes of senior management. If you feel this divide or lack of respect can’t be breached, then it’s time to find a new boss.

6)    Your productivity has slipped – do you find yourself arriving at work late or refusing to work extra hours? Do you spend more time on social media than working? Killing the hours in the day with anything other than work is going to impact your productivity quickly, which will be noticed and confronted fast too. Not good.

7)    Your personal life is suffering – moving on isn’t always about a negative experience in a role. You may love your job and the company you work for, but your personal life may be suffering due to a poor work/life balance. If your company expects unrealistic hours from you and stress management consumes your non-working life, then it’s time to consider your options.

8)    The company is going through a difficult time – another sign that isn’t necessarily about what you do personally, but more who you do it for. Staff and budget cuts may be out of your hands, and you may admirably believe in “all hands on deck” to help the company through a difficult time. But long term, this may not be a realistic solution. If the company makes redundancies, it can result in a difficult working environment and increased productivity for those who remain. You won’t be seen as a rat leaving a sinking ship if you’re putting your career first.

9)    You’ve started looking at other jobs – while there’s no harm in keeping an eye on what’s happening in your sector in terms of important moves, acquisitions and salary levels, if you find yourself frequently searching for jobs and tempted to apply, then you’re tiptoeing from being a passive to an active candidate.

10)    You’re jealous of colleagues who have resigned – last but not least, the most obvious sign. When a colleague hands in their resignation and you can’t help but imagine it were you and the dream role you could have, then it’s definitely time to write that letter!

If you would like help finding your next role or advice on taking the next step in your career, feel free to contact me via our website today.